Fast food naton review

And the success of the fast food industry had tremendous influence within the service sector. It's a gruesome, unforgettable sight, and she, standing in for the rest of us, is suitably horrified.

Fast food nation author

In short, this book is served the way people like it, regardless of its content. This Speedee Service System allowed McDonald's to lower its prices -- drawing a clientele made up largely of families. Just a stupid monkey can note this film bad Schlosser is a serious and diligent reporter, and ''Fast Food Nation'' isn't an airy deconstruction but an avalanche of facts and observations as he examines the fast-food process from meat to marketing. Ninety-six percent of American schoolchildren can identify Ronald McDonald. I understand why many viewers hate it. He is like "Supersize Me" but we see here how is making the food and by who!!! He conveniently avoids these questions: How can he reconcile the math of vast overhead to maintain the land, huge labour cost we want our workers to be paid and insured well , and small customer base transporting meat to all over the country is bad! Because Schlosser is ultimately right: we should know what we eat, even if we are made uncomfortable by the knowledge. The film is a terrible attempt at portraying anything near the value of the book, but like I said, any hint or mention of the nasties that go on because of the highly concentrated power in the corporate sector is worth something.

So what on earth is the point of a movie version that is fictional? Chip in what you can. Because Schlosser is ultimately right: we should know what we eat, even if we are made uncomfortable by the knowledge. One of the most irritating ones is proposing that free-roaming cattle rearing is the way to go.

Fast food nation purpose

A fictional version that is often leadenly acted and scripted, and cravenly attacks only an imaginary burger firm called "Mickey's" - leaving McDonald's and the other real players unchallenged? I have no problem with presenting selected facts to support a theory or argument. To a more demanding audience, it reveals itself quickly and is instantly annoying. In the 's, slaughterhouses were reorganized into assembly lines, de-skilled in the same style as a McDonald's kitchen. The economic fortunes of individual farmers or local communities matter little in the grand scheme. It's the nation's biggest buyer of beef, pork and potatoes, and the world's biggest owner of retail property. Yet Fast Food Nation is far more than a lament for home cooking and mom-and-pop diners. Forecast: This book will find a healthy, young audience; it's notable that the Rolling Stone article on which this book was based generated more reader mail than any other piece the magazine ran in the s. The first part of the book details the postwar ascendance of fast food from Southern California, assessing the impact on people in the West in general. The arrowhead of Schlosser's polemic was a sensational revelation about "faecal matter" in the beef patties. All of its telling details would have made better sense in a documentary, not this made-up version, which looks like a dramatised module in some Open University course on corporate evil. The author offers obvious solutions in the epilogue. Consumerism-wise, what about those insatiable American appetites? At one point, Schlosser quotes a scientist who specializes in food safety. My main suggestion is to please read the book.

The men who built the new industry were rugged individualists, but their insights all revolved around relentless homogeneity -- in the food they offered and in the way they acquired, produced and served it. One of the central themes here is the degree to which the modern fast-food business is defined by the industrialization of most of its parts, a development whose consequences Schlosser sees as almost universally negative.

fast food nation movie

Ninety-six percent of American schoolchildren can identify Ronald McDonald. What is a corporation's responsibility in protecting its workers? Or egg? I do not eat a lot of fast food but I enjoy my occasional burgers from Burger King, crave Chicken McNuggets from time to time and adore KFC w I could easily give this book a 5 for its well-researched and informative content, its engaging pacing, its excellent mix of dry facts and gossipy tone.

Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.

fast food nation article

Teenagers and recent immigrants make up much of the fast food workforce, often under intimidating and poor conditions. These questions are not meant to detract from the quality of Schlosser's work.

Fast food nation main idea

Don't consumers value "value" meaning calories per dollar over quality? Certainly not for everyone. Share via Email Let's get one thing straight. Carefully designed and chemically enhanced, the mysterious beefy essence that we associate with James Beard's favorite French fries, for instance, has less to do with men and women in chef's whites or even polyester shirts and visors than with those in lab coats. At the very least, Schlosser makes it hard to go on eating fast food in blissful ignorance. When an advertisement says that drinking insecticide is good for us, won't our instinct warn us otherwise? I enjoy reading the book but feel misled by its content. Brand-wise, I wonder how KFC fare in all these debacle although tacobell, owned by the same company, gets an honorary mention. Schlosser is a serious and diligent reporter, and ''Fast Food Nation'' isn't an airy deconstruction but an avalanche of facts and observations as he examines the fast-food process from meat to marketing. But unless you root for the film to succeed, the execution is distracting. The book begins with the history of McDonalds which encompasses not only the corporate history but also the history of fast food and its supporting industries. It's just incredible Here is another side of the unfettered money culture that has been celebrated as an exciting orgy of entrepreneurialism and opportunity.
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A review Fast Food Nation